Essential to Japanese cuisine, shoyu, or soy sauce originated from the city of Yuasa in Wakayama. Legend has it that in the 13th century, the Zen Buddhist monk Shinichi Kakushin discovered the wonders of soy sauce totally by accident while making kinzanji miso, a type of bean paste. [...]

Read more

One of Wakayama’s geological wonders, the Sandanbeki rock formation, known as the Sandanbeki Cliffs hide one of Wakayama’s most interesting secret temples in a cave full of history and pirates! [...]

Read more

anjo Garan is another important place of worship in Koyasan and where Kobo Daishi is also worshipped. The legend has it that Kobo Daishi himself, when studying in China, threw his Sankosho (a pestle with three prongs at each end, usually made of gilt bronze) toward Japan and landed in a pine tree. It was […]

Read more

oya-san or Koyasan is a mountain located in Wakayam prefecture and in the center of the Shingo Buddhist sect introduced to Japan in 805 by Kobo Daishi (see Ōsu Kannon – Nagoya), one of Japan’s most important religious figures. It was then natural that such an important and well-respected figure would have to rest in […]

Read more