Located an hour or so by car from Koyasan in the small Onsen village of Ryujin, Kamigoten is a small ryokan with a unique history. Built in 1657, Kamitogen was actually designed to please Yorinobu Tokugawa, a Japanese Feudal lord of Kinokuni. [...]

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Koyasan Daimon Gate was originally built in the 11th century in the Tsuzuraori Valley and was moved a century later to its current location, marking the entrance to the city of Koyasan. Danjo Garan is another important place of worship in Koyasan and where Kobo Daishi is also worshiped. [...]

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The Kumano Hongu Taisha is one of Wakayama Kumano region's three famous shrines. Enshrining its own deity, Hongu Taisha and also the deities of the other two Kumano shrines, Hayatama Taisha and Nachi Taisha, and the sun goddess Amaterasu. It serves as the head shrine of over 3000 Kumano shrines […]

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Located in the heart of Koyasan, Kongobuji was originally constructed in 1593 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi to commemorate the death of his mother. Later Kongobuji was merged with a neighboring temple and reorganized into the head temple of Shingon Buddhism, the sect introduced to Japan by Kobo Daishi in 805 […]

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What once was a popular sento (bathhouse) in the center of Yuasa city in Wakayama, Jinburo is today a free to visit open-air museum where you will not only have the chance to discover an old Japanese sento looked, but also enjoy Jinburo’s annex full of memorabilia of […]

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Essential to Japanese cuisine, shoyu, or soy sauce originated from the city of Yuasa in Wakayama. Legend has it that in the 13th century, the Zen Buddhist monk Shinichi Kakushin discovered the wonders of soy sauce totally by accident while making kinzanji miso, a type of bean paste. [...]

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One of Wakayama’s geological wonders, the Sandanbeki rock formation, known as the Sandanbeki Cliffs hide one of Wakayama’s most interesting secret temples in a cave full of history and pirates! [...]

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Osaka Castle was built by Daimyo Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1583 on the former site of the Ishiyama Honganji Temple. It was originally intended to be the center of Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s vision where he would rule a unified Japan. As such Osaka Castle was, at the time, Japan’s largest castle. [...]

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Located in the outskirts of Osaka city, Sumiyoshi Taisha, also known as Sumiyoshi Grand Shrine is actually one of Japan’s oldest shrines. Founded in the 3rd century, Sumiyoshi Taisha displays a unique style of shrine architecture, called Sumiyoshi-zukuri, that is free of influence from the Asian mainland. [...]

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Located in the city of Sakkai in Osaka prefecture, JIKKO Kitchen Knives Cutlery is one of the best and most famous companies for anyone looking for the finest Japanese cutlery. JIKKO started relatively recently in 1901. Sakkai has been known for the past 600 years for its knife craftwork […]

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The Dotonbori area in Osaka needs no introduction. It’s one of Japan's most famous tourist destinations thanks to its unique and frankly, gaudy neons. Dotonbori is one spot you should not miss when traveling in Japan. [...]

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Simply meaning “New World” Shinsekai was a district developed before the second world war which unfortunately was left neglected for decades afterward and only became popular years later. Built in 1912 just after the Eiffel Tower, the Tsutenkaku now features an open-air deck on top of the main […]

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