The Kami Tokikuni House is the most important residence of the defeated Taira general named Tairo no Tokidata, after he lost the battle of Dannoura. Sent in exile to the isolated region of the Noto peninsula, the general disavowed the clan and stopped using the name Taira, also known as Heike (which literally means “House […]

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Shiroyone Senmaida, or simply Senmaida is Noto Penisula’s most famous sight! Senmaida, which literally mean means “a thousand rice fields” or 1004 according to the Shiroyone Senmaida official website. It offers a breathtaking view from the end of April to July at sunset when the reflection of the sun hits the water-filled rice paddies. But […]

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The Noto Kongo Coast is a 14km long rock formation along the Sea of Japan and located on the west side of the Noto Peninsula below Wajima City. Facing tough elements like harsh winds and the wrath of the wild ocean, the Noto Kongo Coast is considered by many as one of the most beautiful […]

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Founded in 1294 by the Japanese saint Nichizo, a disciple of the Nichiren Sect, the Myōjō-ji Temple (Also known as Myojoji) is located in Noto Peninsula near Wajima and is now the head temple of the Nichiren Sect. Myōjō-ji Temple consists of a set of large buildings, set on atop a hill, which were created […]

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Located on the opposite side of Wajima on the Noto peninsula, Mitsukejima is an small, uninhabited island (150m long, 50m wide and 30m tall) famous for its unique shape. Also known as Gunkanjima “Battleship Island” because of its shape, this island has no link whatsoever with the other famous island named Gunkanjima, located in Nagasaki. […]

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Another very interesting attraction in Wajima is its Kiriko Hall exhibition. Kirikos are huge illuminated festival floats that light up the Noto peninsula city during the summer festival period from July to September, and then exhibited year-round in a dedicated museum located in Wajima city. If you are not fortunate enough to enjoy one of […]

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Let’s face it, the Noto peninsula is far from being the most popular tourist destination in Japan. Only accessible by plane or by car (no railways), this secluded place in Japan is actually a little heaven on earth for those who are looking to enjoy Japan without a horde of tourists (Japanese or not). Wajima, […]

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Located near Lake Yamanaka and just in front of Mt Fuji, Oshino Hakkai is a little village blessed by several crystal clear ponds fed by melting snow from the slopes of Mt. Fuji. Oshino Hakkai, with its location and amazing set of ponds, is the ideal spot for a stunning discovery but only for a […]

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Officially named Kitaguchi Hongū Fuji Sengen Jinja, the Fujiyoshida Sengen Shrine or Fuji Sengen Shrine is dedicated to the Princess Konohanasakuya. It is a Shinto shrine mainly associated with Mount Fuji and, according to the Shrine officials, has over 1,000 “sister” shrines all across Japan. Located in a dense forest at the foot of Mt […]

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Koyo-dai, also known as Koyodai, is according to some people the best place to to enjoy Mt. Fuji in all its glory, and to be honest it would be very difficult to argue with this statement. Located on a small mountain north of Mt. Fuji, Koyo-dai offers a nice 360 degree panoramic viewing tower. This […]

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Destroyed by a landslide in 1966, Iyashi no Sato was a former village located near Lake Saiko and in front of Mt. Fuji. It was only in 2000 that some former villagers and the city hall, decided to rebuild the place into a magnificent open air museum. Here people can not only enjoy some of […]

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Located at the foot of Fujisan (Mt. Fuji) the Aokigahara Jukai is a magnificent forest with an unfortunate dark side. Because of its imposing size (35 square kilometers) and its many rocky and icy caverns, many people come here to commit suicide every year. Despite this downside, Aokigahara Jukai, when you follow one of its […]

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