Constructed in 1168, the first Torii of Itsukushima Shrine is maybe one of Japan’s most famous Torii and actually represents the boundary between the spirit and the human world. While many of you may have had the chance to see the Great Torii in person, we bet that not many of you knew that the […]

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Koinobori is one of Japan many beautiful traditions that comes full of history and meaning. These carp streamers were originally created to celebrate the Tango no Sekku Festival, celebrated on the 5th day of the 5th moon in the lunar calendar. Today, Koinobori are flown to celebrate Kodomo no Hi, or Children’s Day all across […]

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Located in Hiroshima prefecture, Itsukushima Shrine is maybe one of Japan’s most famous shrines thanks to its iconic position on Miyajima island (formerly known as Itsukushima), its unique structure built over the water on pilotis and, finally, for its majestic Great Torii. Itsukushima, now known as Miyajima or the “Shrine Island”, was almost forgotten until […]

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Located a short walking distance from the famous Kanda Myojin Shrine, Yushima Seido is a shrine dedicated to Confucius, the well known and respected Chinese scholar. Confucianism was very popular in Japan during the latter part of the Edo period (1603 ~ 1867) and Yushima Seido used to be part of Confucian school during the […]

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It was in the 12th Century, that Kamakura quickly became a city of both Japanese politics and culture, as influential as Kyoto, with the iconic Tsurugaoka Hachimangu temple at its center. Because of its influence, Kamakura gathered a powerful army and as such had to train its troops and samurais in the latest combat techniques […]

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A typical feature of most Japanese towns, shopping arcades in Hiroshima come in many forms and sizes. But, if you had to visit one, and only one, we would strongly recommend you go and have a walk along the Hondori Arcade. Take time to explore the one-kilometer long covered shopping district and finish your journey […]

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Founded in 940 by Kanchō Daisōjō, a disciple of Kōbō Daishi, Naritasan (Narita-san) Shinshoji (Shinsho-ji) is a Shingon Buddhist temple located in central Narita, and near Narita airport. Despite its age, Naritasan remained a remote and humble temple until Tokugawa Ieyasu (徳川 家康) moved his capital to Edo in 1603. Only then did Naritasan Shinshoji, […]

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Tokyo counts many gorgeous cherry blossom/sakura spots that are all worth your time and attention if you do not mind the bustling crowds. But, away from the masses and mostly kept secret by many photographers and sakura specialists, there is a 2km long sakura wonderland that will literally blow your mind with its beauty and […]

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Aoyama, like Yanaka, hosts a huge cemetery located in the center of Tokyo and open to the public. First opened in 1872 as Tokyo’s’ first municipal cemetery, Aoyama Cemetery hosts many wealthy and historical Japanese figures as its permanent guests, and, surprisingly, Aoyama cemetery is one of the few cemeteries in Japan that has a […]

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Japanese lacquer is one of the most famous and amazing craftworks that one can enjoy or, better still, own. Most often delivered in a simple form like a bowl or a cup, Japanese lacquer is one of the most complex forms of craft, or shall we say art, that you can imagine. While Japan offers […]

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Located five minutes away from Shinjuku by train via the Chuo Line, Nakano Broadway is a huge shopping complex famous for its many anime and idol goods stores as well as its dozens of Mandarake stores! But Nakano Broadway is not only heaven on earth for otaku (geeks) around the world, it is also a […]

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Believe it or not but this castle was actually destroyed 7 years after its completion in 1608! Indeed it was on an order from the Tokugawa Shogunate that enforced a ‘one-castle-per- province’ law (一国一城) that meant Iwakuni Castle had to be destroyed. It was only in 1962 that the actual castle was rebuilt and serves […]

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