Described by many as the little Kyoto of Ehime, Ozu does not only offer one of Japan's most stunning gardens, the Garyu Sanso but also the chance to enjoy the city in a whole new angle by roaming its historic streets also known as Ohanahan Dori (streets). [...]

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Nyoho-ji Temple was originally built by the lord of Kita-gun, Utsunomiya in the Muromachi period (1336 ~ 1573). Closed for several centuries, it was only in 1669 and under the second lord of Ozu Domain, Yasuoki Kato that the temple as we know it today was re-opened. [...]

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Located in the heart of Ehime prefecture and within Ozu’s city management, Oyabu gorge is the definition of a natural wonder. Discovered only recently in 1876 during the Meiji period, the hot spring of Oyabu only became famous during the Taisho period which roughly corresponds to the first quarter […]

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Also known as the official beach of Tokyo, Odaiba’s construction was initially started to protect Tokyo with a series of six fortress islands build in the 1850s. Today you can only access the No. 3 Battery Fortress or Dai-San Daiba which has been open to the public since [...]

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Harajuku is by far one of the most famous districts in Tokyo when it comes to youth fashion and Japanese subculture. While the main point of interest here is the 500m long Takeshita Street and its many trendy shops, used closed stores, fashion boutiques and small Japanese crepe stands […]

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Located in the heart of Uchiko in Ehime, Izumiya is one of those very few places where you can still enjoy the wonder of Japanese old rice terraces. Lost in the mountains, with roads barely larger than your average compact Japanese car, Izumiya is well known all over Japan […]

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Back in early 2000, Akihabara was really the world´s best place to purchase electronics, computer parts, cameras and so on, but almost two decades later, Akihabara is just the ghost of what it used to be. Sure you can still find some interesting stuff there, but the choice […]

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Ozu Castle, also known as Jizogatake Castle, was originally constructed in 1331 by Utsunomiya Toyofusa. However, the structure as represented now was built sometime between 1585 ~ 1617. During this period, the castle was controlled by a number of lords. In 1888 the keep was destroyed by a fire, […]

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Simply meaning “New World” Shinsekai was a district developed before the second world war which unfortunately was left neglected for decades afterward and only became popular years later. Built in 1912 just after the Eiffel Tower, the Tsutenkaku now features an open-air deck on top of the main […]

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While the difference may be subtle for us foreigners, sento and onsen are two different ways to enjoy Japanese bath culture. Simply put onsen means hot spring with hot natural water, while a sento is a paid public bath with heating boilers and dates back to as early as […]

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What could be described as the hidden pearl of Ozu, Garyu Sanso is a subtle yet superb villa located by Ozu’s river and the city’s old town. Built in 1907, and despite its small size, Garyu Sanso is a true masterpiece of both Japanese traditional architecture and design. [...]

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Known by many as the Japanese version of the Champs-Élysées, Omotesando Avenue was in fact originally created in the Taisho Era (1912 – 1926) as the formal pathway to Emperor Meiji and his wife Empress Shoken temple also known as the Meiji Shrine. [...]

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