Daishō-in or Daisyō-in is the historic Japanese temple on Mount Misen, the holy mountain on the island of Itsukushima and walking distance from the famous Itsukushima Shrine. Founded in 806, Daisho-in is the 14th temple in the Chūgoku 33 Kannon Pilgrimage and famous for the maple trees and their brilliant autumn colors. It is also […]

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While many of you may enjoy Miyajima for its unique atmosphere and many temples, this little island also offers many hiking trails that, for the most courageous of you, will give you the opportunity to discover Miyajima like never before. Today’s video covers just a tiny selection of these trails and follows the flow of […]

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Constructed in 1168, the first Torii of Itsukushima Shrine is maybe one of Japan’s most famous Torii and actually represents the boundary between the spirit and the human world. While many of you may have had the chance to see the Great Torii in person, we bet that not many of you knew that the […]

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Located in Hiroshima prefecture, Itsukushima Shrine is maybe one of Japan’s most famous shrines thanks to its iconic position on Miyajima island (formerly known as Itsukushima), its unique structure built over the water on pilotis and, finally, for its majestic Great Torii. Itsukushima, now known as Miyajima or the “Shrine Island”, was almost forgotten until […]

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A typical feature of most Japanese towns, shopping arcades in Hiroshima come in many forms and sizes. But, if you had to visit one, and only one, we would strongly recommend you go and have a walk along the Hondori Arcade. Take time to explore the one-kilometer long covered shopping district and finish your journey […]

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Believe it or not but this castle was actually destroyed 7 years after its completion in 1608! Indeed it was on an order from the Tokugawa Shogunate that enforced a ‘one-castle-per- province’ law (一国一城) that meant Iwakuni Castle had to be destroyed. It was only in 1962 that the actual castle was rebuilt and serves […]

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The Kintai-kyo Bridge has been Iwakuni’s most distinctive landmark since its construction in 1673. Entirely made of wood, and this without the use of any nails, the Kintai bridge is composed of five arches sitting on top of massive stones pillars crossing over the Nishiki river and located on the foot of Mt. Yokoyama where […]

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Built in 1598 by the Daimyo (feudal lord) Mori Terumoto, Hiroshima Castle, also known as the Carp Castle, used to be the home of the feudal lord of the Hiroshima clan. Destroyed by the atomic bomb during the 2nd World War, the castle was only rebuilt in 1958 and now serves as a museum of […]

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Built in 1620 at the order of Asano Nagaakira, a powerful feudal lord (Daimyo) of the Hiroshima clan, the Shukkein-en garden later served as the villa of the Asano family during the Meiji period. Shukkeien, which can be translated into English as “shrunken-scenery garden”, includes valleys, mountains and forests represented in miniature all across the […]

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Japan is the only country in the world that had to suffer the horror of one of the most destructive forces ever created by mankind : an atomic bomb. Preserved as a witness of such horror, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, also known as the Atomic Bomb Dome or Genbaku Dome, was the only structure left […]

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Hiroshima Okonomiyaki, also known as Hiroshimayaki, are among the most famous types of okonomiyaki you can find. While staying in Hiroshima, we decided to stop at the first okonomiyaki we found around the Okonomimura area and start shooting a short video for you, while our “chef’ cooked our “Japanese Pancake” in front of us. Now […]

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In celebration of a new Milestone reached this week (August 2015) : +5,000 Subs on our YouTube Channel! Constructed in 1168, the first Torii of Itsukushima Shrine is maybe one of Japan’s most famous Torii and actually represents the boundary between the spirit and the human world. While many of you may have had the […]

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